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Why Our Collagen is Always Grass-fed

Why Our Collagen is Always Grass-fed

Why Our Collagen is Always Grass-fed

Why Our Collagen is Always Grass-fed

Why Our Collagen is Always Grass-fed

Table of Contents

Why Our Collagen is Always Grass-fed

Why Our Collagen is Always Grass-fed

Why Our Collagen is Always Grass-fed

Why Our Collagen is Always Grass-fed

For thousands of years, collagen-rich foods have been a key part of diets all over the world. At Planet Paleo we wanted to bring the benefits of these foods to people with busy modern day lives, so we created our high quality collagen supplement range. Our collagen powders are always ethically and sustainably sourced, whether its our marine collagen supplements or our pure collagen powders and blends which are derived from pasture raised animals.

We believe cows should be raised in their traditional habitat, free range and eating grass as their main source of food. We source our collagen from a supplier who chooses select farms in South America where traditional cattle ranching methods are utilised and the cattle are allowed to roam freely on pasture lands without the use of pesticides, growth hormones and antibiotics.

Grass-fed Benefits

Pasture raised animals roam freely in their natural environment where they can eat nutritious grass and other plants they are adapted to digesting. They have a much higher quality of life than those confined to the intense conditions of the factory farm system, with thousands of animals crowded together with little access to fresh air or sunlight. These conditions are highly stressful for the animal, animals frequently become sick, and are routinely pumped with antibiotics to prevent outbreaks of disease, this is avoided in pasture-based systems.

Cattle are developed to eat grass and when taken off pasture and put on a grain based diet they can suffer a number of health issues including intestinal damage, dehydration, liver issues or worse. The factory farming system routinely feed on corn or even soy as a cheap way to fatten animals up for market. These diets are usually supplemented with by-products, antibiotics and hormones to promote rapid growth, which can then be present in the end product on supermarket shelves to be consumed by us.

Grass-fed animals get all the nutrients they need from grass and other plants. They have much better welfare standards and there is also reduced environmental damage. Pasture raised systems can help the environment, with soil fertilization and reducing the amount of grain and soy produced as feed- which on such a mass scale is incredibly environmentally damaging and resource intensive. A cow must consume about 8 pounds of grain in order to yield just one pound of meat.

Consuming meat and dairy products from pasture raised animals is also better for us, grass-fed meat and dairy products are lower in calories and total fat, with higher levels of vitamins, antioxidants and a healthier balance of anti-inflammatory Omega-3 fats to pro-inflammatory Omega-6 compared to conventional meat and dairy products.

By choosing pasture-raised you are supporting sustainable farming methods, improving animal wellbeing and promoting health. With collagen being used in so many areas of the body, it’s important to use a high quality source like our collagen supplements which are well absorbed and utilised by the body.

If you decide that our collagen supplements sourced from grass-fed cattle are not for you, don’t forget we also do a marine collagen powder which is ethically and sustainably sourced. Check our our full range of collagen supplements here

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Why Our Collagen is Always Grass-fed

Why Our Collagen is Always Grass-fed

Why Our Collagen is Always Grass-fed

Why Our Collagen is Always Grass-fed

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